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'At around 6am, a man came into the media centre with a camera covered in blood and told us that one of our colleagues had been injured,' said Ahmed Abu Zeid, the culture editor of Mr Assem’s newspaper told 'He had started filming from the beginning of the prayers so he captured the very beginnings and in the video, you can see tens of victims.

Ahmed’s camera will remain a piece of evidence in the violations that have been committed.' Today Egyptian authorities escalated their crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood by ordering the arrest of its spiritual leader, while the group remained steadfast in its defiance of the new military-backed administration and refused offers to join an interim government.

The prosecutor's arrest warrant issued for the Brotherhood's supreme guide, Mohammed Badie, as well as nine other leading Islamists will almost certainly stoke anger among the group's supporters and fellow Islamists.

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A post-Morsi plan put forward by Tamarod called for a largely ceremonial interim president with most power in the hands of the prime minister.

At the heart of liberals' objections is that they wanted to write a new constitution, not amend the one written under Morsi by an Islamist-dominated panel.

That constitution contained several articles that drew fierce criticism from liberal quarters, and helped sparked street protests and violence in 2012.

The sunrise-to-sunset fast cuts down on activity during the day, but the daily protests have been largely nocturnal affairs, and some observers expect the Islamist camp will likely use it to rally its base.

Still, the warrants highlight the military's zero-tolerance policy toward the Brotherhood and other Islamists, who continue to hold daily mass protests and sit-ins demanding reinstating Morsi and rejecting what they describe as a military coup.

The military already has jailed five of Brotherhood leaders, including Badie's powerful deputy Khairat el-Shater, and shut down their media outlets.

Morsi himself remains in custody in an undisclosed location.

In the face of Islamist opposition, the military-backed interim president, Adly Mansour, issued a fast-track timetable on Monday for the transition.

His declaration set out a 7-month timetable for elections but also a truncated, temporary constitution laying out the division of powers in the meantime.

The top liberal political grouping, the National Salvation Front, expressed reservations over the plan late Tuesday, saying it was not consulted - 'in violation of previous promises' - and that the declaration 'lacks significant clauses while others need change or removal.' It did not elaborate but said it had presented Mansour with changes it seeks.

The secular, revolutionary youth movement Tamarod that organized last week's protests, also criticized the plan, in part because it gives too much power to Mansour, including the power to issue laws.